Surveillance

Myrtle Rust research continues to receive coverage

Dr Grant Hamilton and Nadine Nolan’s work in to determining the ecological effects of Myrtle Rust continues to receive coverage from various news outlets. The article outlines details of the research, which involves using unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to help identify occurrences of myrtle rust at the canopy level. For the full article,…

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Society for Conservation Biology Oceania 2016 abstract acceptance

Dr Grant Hamilton and Dr Peter Baxter from the Hamilton Ecology Lab have been accepted to present their abstract and give an oral presentation at the Society for Conservation Biology Oceania meeting in Brisbane July 2016. the abstract is titled “Detecting threatened and threatening species using unmanned aerial surveillance”. This is…

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Hamilton Lab memebers' papers accepted!

Dr Grant Hamilton and Dr Peter Baxter, along with collaborator Dr Stephen Parnell in Salford University UK, have had two peer-reviewed papers accepted for the MODSIM (21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation) conference which takes place on Queensland’s Gold Coast, Nov-Dec 2015. The papers, titled “Fine tuning of unmanned…

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UAS for forestry surveillance and conservation could provide substantially cheaper option

A new study from lead author Dr Rakan Zahawi, from the Organisation for Tropical Studies in partnership with researchers from the University of Maryland and the University of California-Santa Cruz, USA, has indicated that unmanned aerial systems, known more commonly as drones, could successfully monitor the effects of forest regeneration…

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