Surveillance

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Myrtle Rust research continues to receive coverage

Dr Grant Hamilton and Nadine Nolan’s work in to determining the ecological effects of Myrtle Rust continues to receive coverage from various news outlets. The article outlines details of the research, which involves using unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to help identify occurrences of myrtle rust at the canopy level. For the full article…

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Ecosystems in recovery: how do we monitor post eradication?

Islands provide unique opportunities for conservation restoration. Island eradications are becoming more and more common and more successful, particularly for vertebrate pests. As island eradication increases, associated technological advancements are made and our knowledge on secondary poisoning and other direct impacts improves…

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Society for Conservation Biology Oceania 2016 abstract acceptance

Dr Grant Hamilton and Dr Peter Baxter from the Hamilton Ecology Lab have been accepted to present their abstract and give an oral presentation at the Society for Conservation Biology Oceania meeting in Brisbane July 2016. the abstract is titled “Detecting threatened and threatening species using unmanned aerial surveillance”. This is…

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Western Australia no longer free of fruit fly

Western Australia is no longer able to declare itself free of the damaging and wide spread Queensland fruit fly after an infestation was discovered in Perth’s Albert Cove. 2 Male flies were discovered in the Alfred Cove residential area in surveillance traps on the 18th November whilst another 4 were captured on the 23rd November no more…

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Hamilton Lab leads way at MODSIM

The 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation (MODSIM2015) is currently underway at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, Broadbeach, Queensland and Hamilton Ecology lab is leading the way. The theme for this years global conference on modeling and simulation is ‘Partnering with industry and the community for…

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Hamilton Lab memebers' papers accepted!

Dr Grant Hamilton and Dr Peter Baxter, along with collaborator Dr Stephen Parnell in Salford University UK, have had two peer-reviewed papers accepted for the MODSIM (21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation) conference which takes place on Queensland’s Gold Coast, Nov-Dec 2015. The papers, titled “Fine tuning of unmanned…

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UAS for forestry surveillance and conservation could provide substantially cheaper option

A new study from lead author Dr Rakan Zahawi, from the Organisation for Tropical Studies in partnership with researchers from the University of Maryland and the University of California-Santa Cruz, USA, has indicated that unmanned aerial systems, known more commonly as drones, could successfully monitor the effects of forest regeneration…

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UAS now being used to study marine mammals

For the first time, scientist have used unmanned aerial systems to study killer whales from above. A recent articles published in Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems explains how scientists integrated and configured their hexacopter, fine tuning it for precise measurements of families of killer whales captured from above. Read the full…

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Unmanned Aerial Systems continue to prove valuable for farmers

Farmers continue to see the value of using unmanned aerial systems for monitoring and surveillance processes that have traditionally required several people to undertake. A recent UAS workshop in Cordova, Maryland has seen a large agricultural contingency quickly identify several applications for these systems. More here

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South Australian state government to fund new UAV trial

The South Australian government will trial the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as part of a strategy aimed at reducing the impact of wild dogs and other pests in agricultural areas. Read more here

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Detection of Laurel Wilt Disease in Avocado Using Low Altitude Aerial Imaging

The laurel wilt pathogen is threatening Avocado crops of Florida, US, which provide a $100 million-a-year economic impact to the state, but new camera images can give growers a jump-start on the disease. A recent study has shown the effectiveness of a low cost camera in succesfully detecting and discriminating between healthy and laurel…

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LANDSAT dataset now available online

It is often the case in ecology that for various reasons scientists and researches can struggle to collect enough data. Weather, funding, data quality and resolution, health and safety and accessibility can all impact the data collection phase of any research project. Satellite imagery data can sometimes be difficult to acquire, yet…