Spatial ecology

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Paper by Alan Pearse & Grant Hamilton published: "Giant coral reef fishes display markedly different susceptibility to night spearfishing"

Alan Pearse & Grant Hamilton have recently had a paper accepted for publication in Ecology and Evolution. This paper investigates the effect of spearfishing and habitat associations on the abundance of humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus) and bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum). These fish are listed as Endangered and…

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Ecosystems in recovery: how do we monitor post eradication?

Islands provide unique opportunities for conservation restoration. Island eradications are becoming more and more common and more successful, particularly for vertebrate pests. As island eradication increases, associated technological advancements are made and our knowledge on secondary poisoning and other direct impacts improves…

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Guest speaker at QASE

This coming Monday (9th May) The Quantitative Applied Spatial Ecology (QASE) group invite you to a seminar by guest speaker Dr. Alan Woodley [EECS] on the topic “Ecology meets Big Data”. Environmental scientists are increasing taking advantage of much larger and more complex datasets, colloquially known as big data, than they ever have…

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Discovery of new gene may lead to increased spatial range of wheat

Scientists at the University of California, Davis have recently discovered the a fourth gene in wheat responsible for wheat vernalization, the biological process requiring cold temperatures to trigger flower formation. Identification of the newly characterized VRN-D4 gene and its three previously discovered counterpart genes is crucial…

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Wild boar numbers on the rise in Europe

Wild boar numbers in Europe have continued to rise since the 1980’s yet until now it has been unclear what the main drivers of this population growth are. Scientists from the Department of Integrative Biology and Evolution, Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria have now discovered that…

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Novel methods reveal Asian origins of invasive European species

Scientists from the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) have teamed up with colleagues from the Academy of Sciences in Beijing and the Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University to study the ability of Chinese insect and fungal pathogens to colonise European trees. Most recent invasive species found in European…

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Genetic study reveals origin and spread of invasive Walnut twig beetle.

Researchers from the Pacific South-west Research Station (PSW) and partners from the University of California, Riverside and U.S. Forest Service Forest Health Protection have characterised the beetle’s geographic distribution and range expansion through a genetic study across vast spatial areas. An evaluation of population genetics can…

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Genetic diversity increases in invasive population

Typically, invasive species suffer from a lack of genetic diversity compared to their source populations because populations start from a small set of founding individuals. But in a unique twist, it turns out that New Zealand’s stoat population has greater genetic diversity today than the one in Britain, posing some important questions…

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Queensland agriculture continues biosecurity battle as Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus detected on north Queensland farm

A plant virus that wiped out the majority of the Northern Territory’s melon industry, has been found on a watermelon farm in north Queensland. It was initially thought the disease was contained to the Northern Territory however the recent detection of CGGMV on a north Queensland farm has important implications in regards to the spatial…