Posts for May 2015

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Detection of Laurel Wilt Disease in Avocado Using Low Altitude Aerial Imaging

The laurel wilt pathogen is threatening Avocado crops of Florida, US, which provide a $100 million-a-year economic impact to the state, but new camera images can give growers a jump-start on the disease. A recent study has shown the effectiveness of a low cost camera in succesfully detecting and discriminating between healthy and laurel…

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Genetic diversity increases in invasive population

Typically, invasive species suffer from a lack of genetic diversity compared to their source populations because populations start from a small set of founding individuals. But in a unique twist, it turns out that New Zealand’s stoat population has greater genetic diversity today than the one in Britain, posing some important questions…

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Hyenas experts at social networking

Hamilton Ecology Lab’s Dr Rune Rasmussen has recently been working on network analysis, showing how and why relationships form between different individuals among and within groups. This type of analysis can be particularly beneficial in the field of ecology as scientists seek to uncover the relationships that drive social patterns in…

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LANDSAT dataset now available online

It is often the case in ecology that for various reasons scientists and researches can struggle to collect enough data. Weather, funding, data quality and resolution, health and safety and accessibility can all impact the data collection phase of any research project. Satellite imagery data can sometimes be difficult to acquire, yet…

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Prescribed burning of invasive grass species detrimental to biodiversity

Japanese Stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) is considered an invasive pest in about 25 eastern US states. Originally transported to the US as packaging material for the shipment of porcelain from China in 1919, Stiltgrass can have damging effects on local biodiversity. Invasion of Microstegium can reduce growth and flowering of native…

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PBCRC 2135: Optimising surveillance protocols using unmanned aerial systems

As part of the PBCRC 2135 project, optimising surveillance protocols using unmanned aerial systems, Hamilton Ecology Lab has recently begun compiling a national database encompassing information on past incursions of stripe rust throughout grain growing regions of Australia. The database includes information on the location and timing of…

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Dogs and Drones!

In a novel use of technologies, unmanned aerial vehicles are being used in conjunction with trained canines to help detect and eraidcate a damaging fungus of avocado trees spread by the redbay ambrosia beetle. For more information click here.

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Infrared Camera Arrives!

Hamilton Ecology Lab Honours student Jessie Mckee has just received a vital piece of equipment for her ongoing project which looks at detecting cryptic species using thermal imagery. Jessie has already been busy getting familiar with the brand new IPI-R9 Infrared Camera in preparation for her upcoming field work and data collection. The…