The November SPARK: Innovative data collection with children

The session highlights the ways in which children demonstrate competence as research participants, and the challenges and opportunities afforded to researches by the method of data collection.

Agenda:

Children’s involvement in research is increasingly being sought on matters that are of relevance to them. With calls to include children actively in research, attention has turned to considering the data collection methods used, how children do participate and the decisions that might arise for researchers from this participation. This SPARK showcases two studies that used participatory methods of data collection with children. The session highlights the ways in which children demonstrate competence as research participants, and the challenges and opportunities afforded to researches by the method of data collection. It is hoped that this SPARK session will promote conversation about the implications and dilemmas faced by researchers in participatory research with children.

About the speakers:


Jennifer Smith is a third year EdD student at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researching the roles of teachers, students and parents in primary school foreign language homework accomplishment. After spending a year in Japan as a Rotary exchange student she developed a love of language learning and became a Japanese language teacher. She worked as a teacher of Japanese in both primary and secondary schools in regional and remote areas across the state of Queensland for over twenty years. Currently she teaches Teaching English as an Additional Language/Dialect (EAL/D) Learners in the Master of Teaching and Bachelor of Education courses at QUT. Jennifer has previously presented on developing students’ intercultural understanding, skyping in the primary classroom and teacher scaffolding for foreign language homework.



Maryanne Theobald is Senior Lecturer in the School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education. Maryanne has methodological expertise in qualitative approaches including conversation analysis, using video-ethnography and video-stimulated accounts. She has expertise in participatory research with children, teachers, social workers and health professionals, as well as working with practitioner-researchers for professional learning and in Professional Experience. Her research focuses on communication and social interaction, in particular children’s participation, friendships, disputes and peer cultures in classrooms, playgrounds, in multilingual, therapy and transdisciplinary settings. Maryanne is co-leader of the Childhoods in Changing Contexts Research Group at QUT and editor of an international journal Research on Children’s Social Interaction (RoCSI), Equinox.

Details:

Start Date: 20/11/2018