News and Blog

Exercise during CHemotherapy for Ovarian cancer – The ECHO trial

Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of gynaecological cancer death in Australian women, with an overall 5-year survival rate of only 44%, compared to a 5-year survival rate of 99% in women with localised breast cancer. Symptoms of ovarian cancer and side-effects from treatment can negatively impact a woman’s physical wellbeing and quality of…

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The latest technologies in digital health

Skin cancer is one of the most prevalent but also most preventable cancers. Studies assessing skin cancer prevention programs rely heavily on assessing sun exposure behaviours. Traditionally studies collect participant’s self-reported data in a paper-based sun diary format. To improve retention rates and decrease the burden to research participants, apps could be used to collect…

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Seeking volunteers to use a sun protection app

Many Australians still get sunburnt on a regular basis, despite having good knowledge and sun-protective intentions. QUT researchers want to assess the impact, if any, apps designed to decrease sunburn may have on peoples’ sun exposure behaviours. You can participate in this research if you are over 18 years old, are regularly outdoors, own a…

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New technologies keeping people sun safe

Dr Elke Hacker was featured in a segment on the children’s science show Scope on channel 11. On Scope scientists and researchers present stories about their research and latest discoveries. Elke talked about the latest technology and innovation helping to keep people sun safe. Devices range from wearables, to apps and UVR detecting stickers. Elke…

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Less invasive treatments for endometrial cancer patients

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in Australia. Endometrial cancer develops in the lining of the uterus and rates of this cancer are increasing, particularly in women under 40 years of age who are overweight or obese. Endometrial cancer caught early is very curable. The current standard treatment is surgery (a total hysterectomy),…

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Lymphedema following gynaecological cancer

Cancer-related lymphedema is a debilitating condition that adversely influences quality of life. Lymphoedema is a potential problematic complication following treatment for cancer and is the accumulation of excessive amounts of fluid resulting in swelling, most commonly in the arms or legs, but can also occur in other parts of the body. Findings from the LEGS study…

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