skin cancer

Could a UV wristband help prevent sunburn?

As 18,000 school leavers hit the Gold Coast to celebrate the end of school and exams we have come up with a clever way to reach these school leavers – a silicon UV-reactive slider that is included on the official Safer Schoolies wristband that indicates when their skin has had enough sun. Just a couple of sunburns can leave the skin…

(Read more ►)

UV sticker raises cricket fans’ sunscreen use

UV detection stickers trialled by QUT researchers at the November 2017 Ashes Test at the Gabba have scored with cricket fans. The stickers, some of which were tagged with Cricket Australia’s official 2017 campaign hashtag #BeatEngland, contained UV-sensitive ink which changes colour to warn people when the effect of their sunscreen is…

(Read more ►)

Help us to determine safe sun exposure levels

We are seeking participants to help us determine safe sun exposure levels. Participants will be asked to visit the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation to have different low doses of UV radiation on their back and skin biopsies 24 hours after exposure. Participants are reimbursed $100 cash. Click HERE to view the participant…

(Read more ►)

Could smart wearables prevent dangerous sunburn?

Getting sunburnt could be another rebellious rite of passage for young people, says QUT public health researcher Dr Elke Hacker who is testing new UV detection wearables to try to make sun safety part of daily routine. “Throwing off the ‘rashie’ Mum’s made you wear or not putting on a hat after years of ‘no hat, no play,’ are like other…

(Read more ►)

Sun Protection and the Ugly Xmas Rashie

We’ve teamed up with wearable UV indicator sticker company Suncayr and the Ugly Xmas Rashie to look at people’s sun protection habits. People who buy an Ugly Xmas Rashie will receive a sample pack of Suncayr SPOTMYUV™ UV indicating spots that mimic skin to tell you when to reapply sunscreen. Participants are asked to complete an online…

(Read more ►)