Postgraduate study

CARRS-Q delivers QUT-awarded higher degree research at Masters and PhD levels in the fields of road safety, crash and injury prevention, traffic and transport improvement.

Higher degree research opportunities are available through CARRS-Q.

The programs are relevant to national and international practitioners who have completed a degree, have valuable experience in the workforce, and who are keen to make a significant and original contribution to knowledge in the road safety and injury prevention field.

Our dedicated supervisory team have experience in many sectors (e.g. engineering, IT, psychology) and collaborate with supervisors from other Faculties within QUT such as Optometry, Science and Engineering and IHBI.

Find out more about student life in Brisbane: visit HiQ.

What can I study?

  • Cycling, pedestrian and motorcycle safety
  • Driver behaviour
  • Impaired driving
  • Child and youth safety
  • Road and Rail infrastructure
  • Traffic safety culture
  • Eco driving
  • Autonomous vehicles
  • In-vehicle information systems

What background do I need?

  • Behavioural and social science
  • Statistics
  • Education
  • Computer science
  • Public health/epidemiology
  • Traffic engineering
  • Traffic law enforcement

Suggested research topics

Supervisors are available for topics including:

  • Use of emotional design to improve road safety
  • Accident prevention and road safety
  • Human factors guidelines for road systems
  • Innovative approaches to community-based alcohol and/or drug treatment

Please contact us if you are interested in studying in one of these areas, or to discuss your topic.

Use of emotional design to improve road safety

To date, approaches to the design of in-vehicle driving assistance systems such as warnings have mainly focused on functionality, usability, user acceptance and safety. In the past few years, emotional design (Norman, 2004) has received significant research attention. Emotional design goes beyond the notion of functional design by aiming to enhance the quality of user interactions and experience. An emotion is a mental and physiological state associated with a wide variety of feelings, thoughts, and reflected in adaptive behaviour. Investigating emotion can include exploring environmental, physiological and cognitive factors.

Although research has contributed to a better understanding of the effect of emotion on performance, there is no integrated approach aimed at triggering a particular emotion to instruct a safe driving behaviour.

We hypothesize that different emotions such as pleasure, fear, disgust, anger, empathy, or hope can be manipulated to regulate driver’s interactions with his/her vehicle and the environment.

This interdisciplinary research will explore multi-modal interactive concepts to cause changes in the driver’s emotional state with the view to adopting safe driving behaviours. It will study emotional process from the points of interface between physiology, psychology and computer science.

Applicants could be International or Australian residents and should hold First Class Honours degree or equivalent. The applicant should have a good knowledge in physiology and basic computer skills.

Accident prevention and road safety

Preference may be given to applicants with an interest in working on a program of research in one of the following areas:

  • Speed management;
  • Reduction of risk taking by youth;
  • Young passenger safety awareness;
  • Older road user safety;
  • Motorcycle safety;
  • Intelligent technology solutions and the older driver;
  • Intelligent technology solutions and the problem of whiplash;
  • Fleet safety products and interventions.

Applicants with Psychology, Public Health, relevant Social Science or Computer Science qualifications or experience are particularly encouraged to apply. Applicants must be able to demonstrate their capacity to make a significant contribution to original research in order to encourage high quality safety research directly relevant to the objectives of the scholarship.

Human factors guidelines for road systems

The scholar will be required to embark on a program of research into the impact of human factors and driver behaviour on the operation and design of roads. This project will improve all drivers’ ability to use the road in a safe and effective manner. The topic is broad and will be refined to meet the particular interest of the selected student.

Applicants with Engineering or other relevant experience and qualifications are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be able to demonstrate their capacity to make a significant contribution to original research in order to encourage high quality road safety research directly relevant to the objectives of the scholarship.

Innovative approaches to community-based alcohol and/or drug treatment

The scholar will undertake research in the area of treatment programs for persons recruited through the courts for driving over the legal alcohol limit and/or driving impaired by licit or illicit drugs.

Applicants with Psychology, Public Health or other relevant Social Science qualifications or experience are encouraged to apply. This program would have particular interest for someone seeking research qualifications relevant to Clinical Psychology. Applicants must be able to demonstrate their capacity to make a significant contribution to original research.

Contact

Ashlea Haddow, Education & International Development Officer: a.haddow@qut.edu.au or +61 7 3138 4592.